1/32 Spitfire Mk.Ia part 1 -
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Scale: 1/32

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1/32 Spitfire Mk.Ia part 1 - "The Few", 1940 RAF Aces

1/32 Spitfire Mk.Ia part 1 - "The Few", 1940 RAF Aces, double sheet in format A5 size, ASK Distribution no. 200-D32088

The decal sheet contain markings for thre airplanes:

- L1004, F/Lt Alexander V.R.Johnstone, No.602 Squadron, RAF Drem, East Lotian, Great Britain, May 1940

- K9955, flown by F/O Archibald Ashmore McKellar, No.602 Squadron, RAF Drem, East Lothian, Scotland, March 1940

- K9953, flown by F/Lt. Adolph Gysbert Malan, No. 74 Squadron, RAF Hornchurch, Essed, June/July 1940

If necessary, the decal cover varnish can be removed - wash off with Zippo lighter fluid.

ASK Distribution Ltd. in grateful cooperation with Eduard Ltd.

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  • Product code: 200-D32088
  • EAN code: 8599260010574
  • Weight: 0.008 kg
  • Availability:In stock 10+ pc(s)
  • Manufacturer: Art Scale
  • Art Scale
Place Availability
Main warehouse - dispatch within 1 day 72 Pcs
19,80

Scale: 1/32
Description

1/32 Spitfire Mk.Ia part 1 - "The Few", 1940 RAF Aces, double sheet in format A5 size, ASK Distribution no. 200-D32088

The decal sheet contain markings for thre airplanes:

1) L1004, F/Lt Alexander V.R.Johnstone, No.602 Squadron, RAF Drem, East Lotian, Great Britain, May 1940

Alexander Vallance Riddell Johnstone, better known as „Sandy“ Johnstone, achieved his first combat successes in the cockpit of L1004 in late June and early July, when he shot down a He 111, a Ju 88 in cooperation and also damaged a Do 17. On July 12, he took command of No.602 Sqn and increased his score by a further seven kills. In September 1941 he took command of No.263 Wing in Beirut and in April 1942 became sector commander in Haifa, Palestine.As early as September 1942, however, he moved to Malta, where he became commander of Luqa airfield. In January 1943 he returned to operational flying as commander of Krendi Wing with Spitfire Mk.Vc. He commanded the Wing until the end of March 1943, then returned to Britain where he held various command posts until the end oft he war. He ended the war with nine kills (7 + 2), 1 probable and 7 enemy aircraft damaged. Tests of the 1.645 hp Merlin 32 engine were carried out on Spitfire Mk.I L1004 in late 1942. The tests were successful and the decision was made to install this powerplant in the existing Seafire Mk.IIC aircraft. The colour profile shows the appearance oft he aircraft in the second half of May 1940, when the undersurfaces oft he RAF fighters were painted black and white. A triclour was added tot he tail and cockardes of type A1 were painted on the fuselage sides. From June 6, 1940 it was ordered that the undersurfaces of RAF fighters would be camoufalged with Sky paint.

 

2) K9955, flown by F/O Archibald Ashmore McKellar, No.602 Squadron, RAF Drem, East Lothian, Scotland, March 1940

This plane already has a bulletproof windscreen and the new pitot tube, GM 2 gunsight, but still has older type of the antenna mast. The pilot seat is still without any armor. Note the anti-spin slat on the side of the fuselage fuel tank. No. 602 Squadron had their Merlin II engines altered for 100 octane fuel already in February 1940. No. 602 Squadron, part of the Auxiliary Air Force, acquired Spitfires before the war. On the 16th of October 1939 it took part in the shooting down of the first German aircraft over British territory during the KG 30´s air raid on Scapa Flow, and on October 28th shooting down the first German aircraft over the British soil, He 111 over Firth of Forth. Some sources claim McKellar had a part in these takedowns. In the June 1940 he joined No. 605 Squadron equipped with Hurricanes to become Squadron Leader on September 11th. He accomplished 15 kills during the BoB. On October 3rd, 1940 he got 5 wins during a single day, (all above Bf 109E) and became one of 28 Allied Aces in the day. S/Ldr A.A.McKellar died a day after the Battle of Britain officially ended, on November 1st, 1940. It is assumed Hptm. Wolfgang Lippert, CO of II./JG 27, shot him down.

 

3) K9953, flown by F/Lt. Adolph Gysbert Malan, No. 74 Squadron, RAF Hornchurch, Essed, June/July 1940

No. 74 Squadron reinforced their Spitfires in February 1939. A South African Adolf “Sailor” Malan, whose original job was truly a sailor, entered the war on September 6th, 1940, through infamous Battle of Barking Creek incident, where his A Flight accidentally shot down two Hurricanes of No. 56 Squadron. During operation Dynamo accumulated 5 confirmed kills and in the night from 19th to 20th of June managed to destroy two He 111. Malan was opposed of line-astern formation proposing more flexible finger-four formation. Legend says that he damaged the plane of Werner Molders and even injured him on July 28th. On August 8th, he became S/Ldr of No. 75 Squadron, which achieved 38 kills during four sorties led by Malan on August 11th, 1940. That event is known as “Malan´s 11th of August”. Malan had 16 confirmed kills in the BoB. Until the end of his career in 1941 he accumulated 27 confirmed kills and 7 shared kills. He was an amazing tactician, and famous with his Ten rules of air combat. After his retirement in 1946 he became a farmer in South Africa. He was politically active as an opponent of apartheid. He died on September 17th, 1963 at the age of 53.

ASK Distribution Ltd. in grateful cooperation with Eduard Ltd.

If necessary, the decal cover varnish can be removed - wash off with Zippo lighter fluid.

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